Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/33191
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorClark, Andrew E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLohéac, Youennen_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-05-11en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T09:07:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T09:07:54Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/33191-
dc.description.abstractMany years of concerted policy effort in Western countries has not prevented young people from experimenting with cigarettes, alcohol and marijuana. One potential explanation is that social interactions make consumption sticky. We use detailed panel data from the Add Health survey to examine risky behavior (the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and marijuana) by American adolescents. We find that, even controlling for school fixed effects, these behaviors are correlated with lagged peer group behavior. Peer group effects are strongest for alcohol use, and young males are more influential than young females. Last, we present some evidence of non-linearities in social interactions,en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIZA Discussion Papers |x1573en_US
dc.subject.jelC23en_US
dc.subject.jelD12en_US
dc.subject.jelZ13en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordsocial interactionsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsmokingen_US
dc.subject.keyworddrinkingen_US
dc.subject.stwSoziale Beziehungenen_US
dc.subject.stwRauchenen_US
dc.subject.stwAlkoholkonsumen_US
dc.subject.stwJugendlicheen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleIt wasn't me, it was them! Social influence in risky behavior by adolescentsen_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn485624559en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
180.56 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.