Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/32648
Authors: 
Knottenbauer, Karin
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
Papers on economics and evolution 0911
Abstract: 
The paper gives attention to the question of whether the development of evolutionary theories in biology over the last twenty years has any implications for evolutionary economics. Though criticisms of Darwin and the modern synthesis have always existed, most of them have not been widely accepted or have been absorbed by the mainstream. Recent findings in evolutio¬nary biology have started to question again the main principles of the modern synthesis. These findings suggest amongst others that the phenomena of co-operation, communication, and self-organization have been under¬estimated, and that selection is not the predominant factor of evolution, but only one among many. Thus, in evolutionary economics, the question is whether the popular variation-retention-selection principle is still up to date. The implications for evolutionary economics with respect to analogies, generalized Darwinism, and the continuity hypothesis are also addressed.
Subjects: 
Analogies
evo-devo
evolutionary economics
evolutionary biology
co-operation
genes
Lamarckism, modern synthesis
neo-Darwinism
selection
self-organization
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
469.07 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.