Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/29863
Authors: 
Budzinski, Oliver
Year of Publication: 
2003
Series/Report no.: 
Marburger volkswirtschaftliche Beiträge 2003,14
Abstract: 
Contrary to some contemporary arguing, competition economics are characterized by a considerable pluralism of theories and policy paradigms. This includes deviating views on core concepts like the nature of competition, the meaning of efficiency, or the goal of antitrust. The paper demonstrates the incompatibilities of different economic competition theories and policy programs. It argues that this pluralism of concepts is both empirically sustainable and theoretically beneficial for future scientific progress. Therefore, no ultimate competition theory can ever be expected. This has to be considered when competition policy systems are designed, especially on the international level. A minimum of decentralization is necessary to maintain regulatory diversity which keeps the system open for theory innovation and changes in business environment.
Subjects: 
regulatory diversity
institutional federalism
competition policy paradigms
industrial economics
centralism and decentralism
law and economics
methodology of science
JEL: 
L40
H77
B52
L10
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
158.17 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.