Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/226158
Authors: 
Dávid-Barrett, Elizabeth
Gligorov, Vladimir
Krstić, Jelena
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers No. 120
Abstract: 
The provision of public services is an important way for weak states to build legitimacy, as long as the public regards the allocation of resources as impartial and fair. However, in societies where resources have long been distributed according to particularist and informal ties, it may be difficult to ensure an impartial allocation. We argue that the challenge of using service provision to build state legitimacy is complicated by the wider trend towards increasing private provision of public services. This makes it harder to hold the state to account for service provision, especially in transition and developing-country contexts where the distinction between the public and private spheres is in any case blurred. To explore these issues in the context of Serbia, the paper focuses on the public procurement process. We discuss process and outcome indicators of corruption risk in Serbian public procurement, assess the institutional control framework, and consider four recent cases of irregularities that are indicative of corruption risk.
Subjects: 
public procurement
outsourcing
corruption
patronage
legitimacy
transition
ccountability
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.