Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/224804
Authors: 
Boone, Catherine
Dyzenhaus, Alex
Ouma, Seth
Owino, James Kabugu
Gateri, Catherine W.
Gargule, Achiba
Klopp, Jackie
Manji, Ambreena
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper Series 16-178
Abstract: 
Kenya's new constitution, inaugurated in August 2010, altered the institutional structure of the state in complex ways. The general motivation behind reform was to enhance the political representation of ordinary citizens in general and that of marginalized ethno-regional groups in particular, and to devolve control over resources to the county level. In the land domain, reform objectives were as explicit and hard-hitting as they were anywhere else. Reform of land law and land administration explicitly aimed at putting an end to the bad old days of overcentralization of power in the hands of an executive branch considered by many to be corrupt, manipulative, and self-serving.
Subjects: 
Kenya
Devolution
Land laws
Reform
Governance
Rural livelihoods
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
704.26 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.