Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/217227
Authors: 
Falk, Armin
Kosse, Fabian
Schildberg-Hörisch, Hannah
Zimmermann, Florian
Year of Publication: 
2020
Series/Report no.: 
DICE Discussion Paper 339
Abstract: 
This study presents descriptive and causal evidence on the role of the social environment in shaping the accuracy of self-assessment. We introduce a novel incentivized measurement tool to measure the accuracy of self-assessment among children and use this tool to show that children from high socioeconomic status (SES) families are more accurate in their self-assessment, compared to children from low SES families. To move beyond correlational evidence, we then exploit the exogenous variation of participation in a mentoring program designed to enrich the social environment of children. We document that the mentoring program has a causal positive effect on the accuracy of children's self-assessment. Finally, we show that the mentoring program is most effective for children whose parents provide few social and interactive activities for their children.
Subjects: 
Self-Assessment
Beliefs
Experiments
Randomized Intervention
Children
JEL: 
D03
C21
C91
I24
ISBN: 
978-3-86304-338-4
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.