Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/204512
Authors: 
Villalobos Barría, Carlos
Chávez Rebolledo, Carlos
Uribe, Adolfo
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
IAI Discussion Papers No. 243
Abstract: 
This work explores the consequences that different energy poverty definitions might have in the energy policy debate. We estimate the ten percent rule index (TPRI) while proposing and measuring a multidimensional energy poverty index (PMEPI). Both indices uses the 2017 National Survey of Public Perception on Energy applied to a sample of 3,500 households in Chile. Although both measures find that the energy poor represents about 15% of the population, energy poverty levels vary differently across the population depending on the employed measure. Moreover, the indices produce different energy poverty rankings across the territory, and most energy poor households are either TPRI poor or PMEPI poor. We found that this discrepancy between both energy poverty measures is mostly explained by territorylinked factors such as public lighting, service quality, service reliability, and thermal comfort. Consequently, an energy poverty analysis based solely on income or energy expenditure information (TPRI) is likely to neglect supply side constraints that are captured by the PMEPI. When identifying and targeting the energy deprived, the conclusion is that both energy poverty measures should not be used as substitutes but as complements.
Subjects: 
Energy Poverty
Poverty
Multidimensional Energy Poverty Index
Ten Percent Rules Energy Poverty Index
Affordability
Reliability of Energy Services
Quality of Energy Services
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
990.12 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.