Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/199070
Authors: 
Cahan, Dodge
Dörr, Luisa
Potrafke, Niklas
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
ifo Working Paper No. 296
Abstract: 
We examine the extent to which government ideology has influenced monetary policy in OECD countries since the 1970s. In line with important changes in the global econ-omy and differences across countries, regression results yield heterogeneous infer-ences depending on the time period and the exchange rate regime/central bank de-pendence of the countries in the sample. Over the 1972-2010 period, Taylor rule speci-fications do not suggest a relationship between government ideology and monetary policy as measured by the short-term nominal interest rate or the rate of monetary expansion minus GDP trend growth. Monetary policy was, however, associated with government ideology in the 1990s: short-term nominal interest rates were lower under leftwing than rightwing governments when central banks depended on the directives of the government and exchange rates were flexible. Very independent central banks, however, raised interest rates when leftwing governments were in office. We describe the historical evidence for several individual countries.
Subjects: 
Government ideology
monetary policy
partisan politics
panel data
JEL: 
D72
E52
E58
C23
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.