Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/196897
Authors: 
McLaughlin, Eoin
Pecchenino, Rowena
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
eabh Papers 19-01
Abstract: 
In the decade before the famine, Ireland experienced a boom in Microfinance Institutions (MFIs). This paper analyses the motivations of MFI proponents and practitioners, and finds evidence linking the boom in MFIs with the introduction of the poor law in 1838. Many contemporary writers saw microfinance as a complex tax avoidance/reduction scheme that could lessen the burden on rate payers by helping the poor help themselves. The link between MFIs and the poor law is confirmed by an econometric analysis of MFIs at the level of the poor law union.
Subjects: 
microfinance
inequality
development
Ireland
JEL: 
G21
H75
I38
N23
N33
N83
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.