Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/195229
Authors: 
Berdell, John
Ghoshal, Animesh
Year of Publication: 
2015
Citation: 
[Journal:] Latin American Economic Review [ISSN:] 2196-436X [Volume:] 24 [Year:] 2015 [Issue:] 15 [Pages:] 1-18
Abstract: 
We examine the influence of two distinct regime changes in US border security on the number of persons traveling from the US into Mexico on day trips. In contrast to increases in overall US tourism to Mexico and rapidly growing trade linkages, day trips to Mexico fell by over 20 % between 2000 and 2012. In the popular press, the reduction in short visits is widely attributed to a rising tide of violence in the Mexican border states, more specifically to a rise in the rate of homicides as a result of the emergence, or radical transformation, of a drug war in Mexico. We show that changes in the US border regime caused a large reduction of day trips and border tourism, and in doing so had a large negative effect on the Mexican border. We situate this result within the literature devoted to analyzing the effects of changes in international documents on tourist flows.
Subjects: 
Tourism
Constraints to travel
Regional integration
Border security
JEL: 
F15
F52
R21
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
874.15 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.