Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/162104
Authors: 
Wnuk, Marcin
Year of Publication: 
2017
Citation: 
[Journal:] Contemporary Economics [ISSN:] 2300-8814 [Volume:] 11 [Year:] 2017 [Issue:] 1 [Pages:] 31-44
Abstract: 
Job satisfaction is an important predictor of job switching. Knowledge of the predictors of job satisfaction offers business owners and management staff the ability to shape the work environment so that the most valuable, loyal, and experienced employees can be retained in the company. The objective of this project is to test a model of job satisfaction based on person-organization fit (P-O fit), perceived organizational support (POS), and perceived supervisor support (PSS). The study examines whether PSS directly relates to employee job satisfaction or whether P-O fit or POS mediate in this relationship. Additionally, it is examined whether POS is a moderating variable between P-O fit and job satisfaction. The study was conducted using a sample 484 employees of a company in the IT sector. It turns out that POS, and P-O fit to the organization are variables that act as partial mediator between PSS and job satisfaction. The relationship between PSS and POS is both direct and indirect. P-O fit is a partial mediator of this relationship, while POS is both a partial mediator and a moderator between P-O fit and job satisfaction. Among employees who POS to be high, consistency between an employee's and the organization's values is indirectly connected with job satisfaction, whereas among employees who POS to be low, this relationship is both direct and indirect. In their operations, employers should focus on shaping managers' attitudes towards their subordinates in an appropriate direction, as managers significantly influence employees' perceived organizational support and job satisfaction.
Subjects: 
job satisfaction
person-organization fit
perceived organizational support
perceived supervisor support
JEL: 
J28
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.