Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/153070
Authors: 
Chmelarova, Viera
Schnabl, Gunther
Year of Publication: 
2006
Series/Report no.: 
ECB Working Paper 636
Abstract: 
The target zone model by Krugman (1991) assumes that foreign exchange intervention targets exchange rate levels. We argue that the fit of this model depends on the stage of development of capital markets. Foreign exchange intervention of countries with highly developed capital markets is in line with Krugman’s (1991) model as the exchange rate level is targeted (mostly to sustain the competitiveness of exports) and the volatility of day-to-day exchange rate changes are left to market forces. In contrast, countries with underdeveloped capital markets control both volatility of day-to-day exchange rate changes as well as long-term fluctuations of the exchange rate levels to sustain the competitiveness of exports as well as to reduce the risk for short-term and long-term payment flows. Estimations of foreign exchange intervention reaction functions for Japan and Croatia trace the asymmetric pattern of foreign exchange intervention in countries with developed and underdeveloped capital markets.
Subjects: 
foreign exchange intervention
reactions functions
target zones
underdeveloped capital markets
JEL: 
F31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
819.91 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.