Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/142482
Authors: 
Gayer, Ted
Year of Publication: 
2001
Series/Report no.: 
EERI Research Paper Series 10/2001
Abstract: 
This paper presents a model of vehicle choice and empirically examines the risk posed by light trucks (sport-utility vehicles, vans, and pickups) to those that drive them and to other drivers, relative to the risk posed by cars. It compares the relative risk of dying and the relative crash frequencies of light trucks versus cars. The identification strategy uses information on pedestrian fatalities by vehicle type to correct for the sample selection bias that may exist due to the lack of reliable data on non-fatal crashes. Using data on all two-vehicle fatal crashes from 1991 through 1998, the results suggest that a light truck driver is 0.29 to 0.69 times as likely to die than is a car driver and is 1.48 to 2.63 times as likely to kill the opposing driver than is a car driver. Other data suggest that light trucks are approximately 2.2 times as likely to get into a crash than are cars.
Subjects: 
Sample Selection Bias
Externalities
Public Health
JEL: 
C20
D62
I18
R40
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.