Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/115363
Authors: 
Baert, Stijn
Year of Publication: 
2015
Citation: 
[Journal:] Economics: The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal [Volume:] 9 [Issue:] 2015-25 [Pages:] 1-11
Abstract: 
Correspondence studies are nowadays viewed as the most compelling avenue to test for hiring discrimination. However, these studies suffer from one fundamental methodological problem, as formulated by Heckman and Siegelman (The Urban Institute audit studies: Their methods and findings. In M. Fix, and R. Struyk (Eds.), Clear and convincing evidence: Measurement of discrimination in America, 1993), namely the bias in their results in case of group differences in the variance of unobserved determinants of hiring outcomes. In this study, the authors empirically investigate this bias in the context of gender discrimination. The authors do not find significant evidence for the feared bias.
Subjects: 
Correspondence experiments
Gender discrimination
Unobserved heterogeneity
JEL: 
J16
J71
M51
J41
C93
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
239.06 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.