Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/105399
Authors: 
Abou-Zaid, Ahmed S.
Leonce, Tesa
Year of Publication: 
2014
Citation: 
[Journal:] Contemporary Economics [ISSN:] 2084-0845 [Publisher:] Vizja Press & IT [Place:] Warsaw [Volume:] 8 [Year:] 2014 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] 219-228
Abstract: 
Despite the conventional consensus that interest rates are efficient mechanism of allocating loanable funds and the most influential monetary policy instrument in modern economies, the three major monotheistic religions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, prohibit the use of interest and consider charging interest as an act of exploitation and extortion. Several passages and verses in the Torah, the Bible, and the Quran make their position on interest clear and definitive, from the Bible's dictum, "Do not charge your brother interest" to the Quran's exhortation "give up what remains of your demand for usury." This paper reviews those passages and verses, provides different scholars' perspectives on these verses, and relates them to the current financial system. The paper also presents several recent events that support the religious position by showing the negative impact of interest on countries, societies, and individuals. These events have, in fact, inspired many economists and financial institutions to seek alternatives to the current system.
Subjects: 
e-tourism
Interest rates
relegions
Islam
Christianity
Judaism
JEL: 
E4
Z1
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
302.91 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.