Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/104989
Authors: 
Hinte, Holger
Zimmermann, Klaus F.
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Policy Paper 87
Abstract: 
Calculating the net fiscal effects of immigration not just for a fiscal year but over the lifespan of immigrant cohorts accentuates the assets and deficits in migration and integration policies and their long-term potential. The less national policies concentrate on a labor migrant selection process according to economic criteria, the higher the risk of generating economic losses or only a reduced surplus. A country comparison of net tax payments and generational accounts for migrants and natives reveals even more clearly that the right mix of migrants will give the best chance to maximize positive and sustainable net fiscal effects to the benefit of society. Similar socio-economic frameworks - as in the western welfare states of Denmark and Germany showcased in this paper - may still result in substantially different economic outcomes of migration. Traditional immigration countries with a long experience in selecting migrants are nonetheless confronted with the need to evaluate and adapt their policies. They may also learn from the results of net fiscal balancing.
Subjects: 
socio-economic effects of migration
generational accounting
immigrant selection
integration
JEL: 
F22
J61
E61
E62
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
816.12 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.