Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/99125
Authors: 
Lambie-Hanson, Lauren
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Public Policy Discussion Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 13-1
Abstract: 
Studies of foreclosure externalities have overwhelmingly focused on the impact of forced sales on the value of nearby properties, typically finding modest evidence of foreclosure spillovers. However, many quality-of-life issues posed by foreclosures may not be reflected in nearby sale prices. This paper uses new data from Boston on constituent complaints and requests for public services made to City government departments, matched with loan-level data, to examine the timing of foreclosure externalities. I find evidence that property conditions suffer most while homes are bank owned, although reduced maintenance is also common earlier in the foreclosure process. Since short sales prevent bank ownership, they should result in fewer neighborhood disamenities than foreclosures.
JEL: 
G11
G21
R31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
428.38 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.