Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/99122
Authors: 
Fuster, Andreas
Willen, Paul S.
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Public Policy Discussion Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 12-10
Abstract: 
Surprisingly little is known about the importance of mortgage payment size for default, as efforts to measure the treatment effect of rate increases or loan modifications are confounded by borrower selection. We study a sample of hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages that have experienced large rate reductions over the past years and are largely immune to these selection concerns. We show that interest rate changes dramatically affect repayment behavior. Our estimates imply that cutting a borrower's payment in half reduces his hazard of becoming delinquent by about two-thirds, an effect that is approximately equivalent to lowering the borrower's combined loan-to-value ratio from 145 to 95 (holding the payment fixed). These findings shed light on the driving forces behind default behavior and have important implications for public policy.
JEL: 
G21
E43
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
474.79 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.