Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/99118
Authors: 
Kodrzycki, Yolanda K.
Muñoz, Ana Patricia
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Public Policy Discussion Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 13-3
Abstract: 
This paper provides a review of the literature on U.S. central city growth and distress during the second half of the twentieth century.It finds that city growth tended to be higher in metropolitan areas with favorable weather, higher growth, and greater human capital, while distress was strongly correlated with city-level manufacturing legacy. The article affirms that distress has been highly persistent, but that some cities have achieved resurgence through a combination of strong leadership, collaboration across sectors and institutions, clear and broad-based strategies, and significant infrastructure investments. Finally, the article explores measurement issues by comparing two methodologies used to identify poorly performing central cities: comparisons across a comprehensive national cross-section of cities and comparisons within smaller samples of similar cities. It finds that these approaches have produced similar assessments of a city's status, except in some cases where the city's progress has been uneven across time or with respect to alternative criteria.
JEL: 
R11
R12
R23
R58
O15
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
438.02 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.