Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/98861
Authors: 
Hessels, Jolanda
Brixy, Udo
Naudé, Wim
Gries, Thomas
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper 14-011/VII
Abstract: 
We extend Lazear’s theory of skills variety and entrepreneurship in three directions. First, we provide a theoretical framework linking new business creation with an entrepreneur’s skill variety. Second, in this model we allow for both generalists and specialists to possess skill variety. Third, we test our model empirically using data from Germany and the Netherlands. Individuals with more varied work experience seems indeed more likely to successfully start up a new business and being a generalist does not seem to be important in this regard. Finally, we find that innovation positively moderates the relationship between having varied experiences, and being successful in starting up a new business. Our conclusion is that entrepreneurs with more varied work experience are more likely to introduce innovations that have not only technical, but also commercial value. Our findings support the notion that entrepreneurship can be learned.
Subjects: 
entrepreneurship
start-ups
human capital
innovation
skills
JEL: 
L26
M13
J24
O31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
291.2 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.