Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/98393
Authors: 
Schultz, T. Paul
Year of Publication: 
2003
Series/Report no.: 
Center Discussion Paper 853
Abstract: 
A consensus has been forged in the last decade that recent periods of sustained growth in total factor productivity and reduced poverty are closely associated with improvements in a population's child nutrition, adult health, and schooling, particularly in low-income countries. Estimates of the productive returns from these three forms of human capital investment are nonetheless qualified by a number of limitations in our data and analytical methods. This paper reviews the problems that occupy researchers in this field and summarizes accumulating evidence of empirical regularities. Social experiments must be designed to assess how randomized policy interventions motivate families and individuals to invest in human capital, and then measure the changed wage opportunities of those who have been induced to make these investments.
Subjects: 
Health
Productivity
Human Capital
Schooling
Returns
JEL: 
J24
I12
I21
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
71.95 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.