Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/98317
Authors: 
Schultz, T. Paul
Year of Publication: 
2003
Series/Report no.: 
Center Discussion Paper 875
Abstract: 
Wage-differentials by education of men and women are examined from African household surveys to suggest private wage returns to schooling. It is commonly asserted that returns are highest at primary school levels and decrease at secondary and postsecondary levels, whereas private returns in six African countries are today highest at the secondary and post secondary levels, and rates are similar for women as for men. The large public subsidies for postsecondary education in Africa, therefore, are not needed to motivate students to enroll, and those who have in the past enrolled in these levels of education are disproportionately from the better-educated families. Higher education in Africa could be more efficient and more equitably distributed if the children of well-educated parents paid the public costs of their schooling, and these tuition revenues facilitated the expansion of higher education and financed fellowships for children of the poor and less educated parents.
Subjects: 
Africa
Wage Returns to Schooling
Inequality
HIV/AIDS
JEL: 
O15
O55
J31
J24
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
280.44 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.