Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/98308
Authors: 
Schultz, T. Paul
Year of Publication: 
2001
Series/Report no.: 
Center Discussion Paper 833
Abstract: 
Economic explanations for the fertility transition focus on the role of returns to schooling, especially for women, which have encouraged women to obtain more education and facilitated the rise in women's wages relative to men's. The private opportunity costs of children have therefore increased, and parents have been motivated to substitute child schooling for additional births Declines in fertility have proceeded unevenly, first across the high income countries, and more recently across the low income countries. The cross sectional differentials in fertility are also frequently analyzed in household surveys, suggesting parallels with the cross-country comparisons. At an aggregate level, states have simultaneously legislated socialized support for the consumption of the elderly, which has eroded the incentives for childbearing, and subsidized child human capital through schools and public health programs, which has encouraged parents to demand fewer, higher quality, children.
Subjects: 
Fertility Transition
Women's Schooling
Women's Wages
Child Mortality
JEL: 
D19
J10
J13
N30
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
43.51 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.