Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/98260
Authors: 
Ranis, Gustav
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
Center Discussion Paper 891
Abstract: 
Arthur Lewis' seminal 1954 paper and its emphasis on dualism appeared at a time when neither the work of Keynes or Harrod-Domar nor the later neoclassical production function of Solow seemed relevant for developing countries. As a consequence, his model, rooted in the classical tradition, plus its many extensions, generated an extensive literature at the center of development theory. The approach also encountered increasingly strong criticism, some of the 'red herring' variety, but some, spearheaded by neoclassical microeconomists like Rosenzweig, also raised serious challenges, focused especially on its labor market assumptions. This paper reviews this landscape and asks what theoretical or policy relevance the Lewis model retains for today's developing countries.
Subjects: 
Development Theory
Dualism
Labor Markets
JEL: 
O11
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
53.44 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.