Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/97020
Authors: 
Asiedu, Edward
Ibanez, Marcela
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
GlobalFood Discussion Papers 30
Abstract: 
This paper investigates the hypothesis that women are underrepresented in leadership roles due to a lower ability to influence others. By comparing societies that differ in the inheritance rights of men and women, we trace the origins of such difference. The results of a public good game with third party punishment indicate that in patriarchal societies there are persistent gender differences in social influence while in matrilineal societies these differences are smaller. While in the patriarchal society sanctioning behavior is not different across genders, cooperation is lower in groups with a female monitor than a male monitor. In contrast, in the matrilineal society male monitors sanction more often than female monitors, though cooperation does not depend on the gender of the monitor.
Subjects: 
Gender
norm enforcement
culture
inequality
collective action
JEL: 
C92
C93
D03
J14
J16
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
706.71 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.