Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/96852
Authors: 
Niepmann, Friederike
Schmidt-Eisenlohr, Tim
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo Working Paper 4761
Abstract: 
Banks play a critical role in facilitating international trade by guaranteeing international payments and thereby reducing the risk of trade transactions. This paper employs banking data from the U.S. to document new empirical patterns regarding the use of letters of credit and similar bank guarantees. The analysis reveals that trade finance is a large and highly concentrated business. It corresponds to roughly 20 percent of U.S. exports, with the top five banks extending more than 90 percent of the guarantees. We find that exporters use letters of credit the most when exporting to countries with intermediate levels of risk. Moreover, they rely more on this instrument in times when funding is cheap and aggregate uncertainty is high. However, firms do not respond uniformly to changes in global interest rates and risk. Those that ship to high and low risk countries adjust their use of letters of credit the most. A modification of the standard model of payment contract choice in international trade is needed to rationalize these empirical findings.
Subjects: 
trade finance
multinational banks
risk
letter of credit
JEL: 
F21
F23
F34
G21
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.