Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/96784
Authors: 
Powdthavee, Nattavudh
Wooden, Mark
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 8127
Abstract: 
Very little is known about how the differential treatment of sexual minorities could influence subjective reports of overall well-being. This paper seeks to fill this gap. Data from two large surveys that provide nationally representative samples for two different countries – Australia (the HILDA Survey) and the UK (the UK Household Longitudinal Study) – are used to estimate a simultaneous equations model of life satisfaction. The model allows for self-reported sexual identity to influence a measure of life satisfaction both directly and indirectly through seven different channels: (i) income; (ii) employment; (iii) health (iv) partner relationships; (v) children; (vi) friendship networks; and (vii) education. Lesbian, gay and bisexual persons are found to be significantly less satisfied with their lives than otherwise comparable heterosexual persons. In both countries this is the result of a combination of direct and indirect effects.
Subjects: 
sexual orientation
sexual minorities
discrimination
life satisfaction
HILDA Survey
UKHLS
JEL: 
I31
J71
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
365.47 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.