Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/96775
Authors: 
Duque, Juan Carlos
Jetter, Michael
Sosa, Santiago
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 8052
Abstract: 
This paper argues that UN military interventions are geographically biased. For every 1,000 kilometers of distance from the three Western permanent UNSC members (France, UK, US), the probability of a UN military intervention decreases by 4 percent. We are able to rule out several alternative explanations for the distance finding, such as differences by continent, colonial origin, bilateral trade relationships, foreign aid flows, political regime forms, or the characteristics of the Cold War. We do not observe this geographical bias for non-military interventions and find evidence that practical considerations could be important factors for UNSC decisions to intervene militarily.
Subjects: 
United Nations
conflict resolution
international organizations
JEL: 
D74
F52
F53
N40
R12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
824.18 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.