Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/96746
Authors: 
Gregory, Robert G.
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 8061
Abstract: 
Three decades ago most immigrants to Australia with work entitlements came as permanent settlers. Today the annual allocation of temporary visas, with work entitlements, outnumbers permanent settler visas by a ratio of three to one. The new environment, with so many temporary visa holders, has led to a two-step immigration policy whereby an increasing proportion of immigrants come first as a temporary immigrant, to work or study, and then seek to move to permanent status. Around one half of permanent visas are allocated on-shore to those who hold temporary visas with work rights. The labour market implications of this new two-step system are substantial. Immigrants from non-English speaking countries (NES), are affected most. In their early years in Australia, they have substantially reduced full-time employment and substantially increased part-time employment, usually while attending an education institution. Three years after arrival one third of NES immigrants are now employed part-time which, rather than unemployment, is becoming their principal pathway to full-time labour market integration. Surprisingly, little has changed for immigrants from English speaking countries (ES).
Subjects: 
immigrant part-time employment
fee paying foreign students
temporary employment visas
labour market integration
immigrants
employment
JEL: 
J15
J61
J68
F22
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
403.59 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.