Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Pan Ké Shon, Jean-Louis
Verdugo, Gregory
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 8062
Analysing restricted access census data, this paper examines the long-term trends of immigrant segregation in France from 1968 to 2007. Similar to other European countries, France experienced a rise in the proportion of immigrants in its population that was characterised by a new predominance of non-European immigration. Despite this, average segregation levels remained moderate. While the number of immigrant enclaves increased, particularly during the 2000s, the average concentration for most groups decreased because of a reduction of heavily concentrated census tracts and census tracts with few immigrants. Contradicting frequent assertions, neither mono-ethnic census tract nor ghettoes exist in France. By contrast, many immigrants live in census tracts characterised by a low proportion of immigrants from their own group and from all origins. A long residential period in France is correlated with lower concentrations and proportion of immigrants in the census tract for most groups, though these effects are sometimes modest.
spatial segregation
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
216.06 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.