Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/96720
Authors: 
Pan Ké Shon, Jean-Louis
Verdugo, Gregory
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 8062
Abstract: 
Analysing restricted access census data, this paper examines the long-term trends of immigrant segregation in France from 1968 to 2007. Similar to other European countries, France experienced a rise in the proportion of immigrants in its population that was characterised by a new predominance of non-European immigration. Despite this, average segregation levels remained moderate. While the number of immigrant enclaves increased, particularly during the 2000s, the average concentration for most groups decreased because of a reduction of heavily concentrated census tracts and census tracts with few immigrants. Contradicting frequent assertions, neither mono-ethnic census tract nor ghettoes exist in France. By contrast, many immigrants live in census tracts characterised by a low proportion of immigrants from their own group and from all origins. A long residential period in France is correlated with lower concentrations and proportion of immigrants in the census tract for most groups, though these effects are sometimes modest.
Subjects: 
immigration
spatial segregation
France
JEL: 
J61
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
216.06 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.