Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/96634
Authors: 
Barrow, Lisa
Rouse, Cecilia Elena
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago 2013-07
Abstract: 
Using survey data from a field experiment in the U.S., we test whether and how financial incentives change student behavior. We find that providing post-secondary scholarships with incentives to meet performance, enrollment, and/or attendance benchmarks induced students to devote more time to educational activities and to increase the quality of effort toward, and engagement with, their studies; students also allocated less time to other activities such as work and leisure. While the incentives did not generate impacts after eligibility had ended, they also did not decrease students' inherent interest or enjoyment in learning. Finally, we present evidence suggesting that students were motivated more by the incentives provided than simply the effect of giving additional money, and that students who were arguably less time-constrained were more responsive to the incentives as were those who were plausibly more myopic. Overall these results indicate that well-designed incentives can induce post-secondary students to increase investments in educational attainment.
Subjects: 
Education
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
500.36 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.