Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/96560
Authors: 
Wathieu, Luc
Friedman, Allan
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
ESMT Working Paper 09-001
Abstract: 
This paper shows that privacy concerns in commercial contexts are not solely driven by a desire to control the transmission of personal information or to avoid intrusive direct marketing campaigns. When they express privacy concerns, consumers anticipate indirect economic consequences of data use, such as price discrimination. Our general hypothesis is that consumers are capable of expressing differentiated levels of concerns in the presence of changes that suggest indirect consequences of information transmission. We suggest that there is a homo economicus behind privacy concerns, not simply a primal fear. This hypothesis is tested in a large-scale experiment evoking the context of affinitybased direct marketing of insurances, which relies on data transmitted by alumni associations. Because opt-in and opt-out choices offered by firms to consumers usually capture non-situational preferences about data transmission, their ability to enact privacy concerns is questioned by our findings.
Subjects: 
privacy
opt-in/opt-out
insurance
JEL: 
D8
M38
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.