Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/95468
Authors: 
Hellebrandt, Tomas
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
LIS Working Paper Series 604
Abstract: 
The Great Recession has increased concerns over the fairness of the distribution of wealth and income in many societies. Using data on eight advanced economies (Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Slovakia, Spain, the United Kingdom, and United States) between 2007 and 2010, I show how the Great Recession affected income inequality in different countries and how families and the state tried to mitigate its impact - through redistributing income within households and through the tax and benefit system. In most countries redistribution within household, through the social safety net and through direct taxes has been largely successful in offsetting the effect on income inequality of increased earnings inequality caused by the rise in unemployment in this pre-austerity period. I discuss some policy lessons that emerge from the varying experiences of different countries.
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
648.58 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.