Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/94602
Authors: 
Zak, Paul J.
Park, Kwang Woo
Year of Publication: 
2000
Series/Report no.: 
Claremont Colleges Working Papers in Economics 2000-20
Abstract: 
This paper builds an age-structural model of human population genetics in which agents are endowed with a high-dimensional genome that determines their cognitive and physical characteristics. Young adults optimally search for a marriage partner, work for firms, consume goods, save for old age and, if married, decide how many children to have. Applying the fundamental genetic operations, children receive genetic material from their parents. An agent's human capital (productivity) is an aggregate of the received genetic endowment and environmental influences. Thus, the population of agents and the economy co-evolve. The model examines the impact of social and economic institutions on economic performance, including inequality in income and genetic attributes, the transition to an information economy, population bottlenecks, matchmaking, and love. We find that institutional factors significantly impact economic performance by affecting marriage, family size, and the intergenerational transmission of genes.
Subjects: 
growth
population biology
psychology
fertility
marriage
genetics
evolution
JEL: 
J12
J13
J24
O40
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
475.12 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.