Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/94599
Authors: 
Zak, Paul J.
Year of Publication: 
2000
Series/Report no.: 
Claremont Colleges Working Papers in Economics 2000-21
Abstract: 
Recent biomedical research shows that roughly three-quarters of cognitive abilities are attributable to genetics and family environment. This paper presents a theory of growth in which human capital is determined by inheritable factors and family size. The distribution of income is shown to affect the number of births, with greater inequality raising the fertility rates and reducing output growth in the transitional dynamics. If human or physical stocks are sufficiently low, the model shows that an economy can be caught in a fertility-caused poverty trap, while countries with more resources will converge to a balanced growth path where the average transmission of human capital from parents to childern determines the long-run rate of output growth.
Subjects: 
genetics
siblings
growth
fertility
human capital
JEL: 
D9
J13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
389.58 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.