Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/94592
Authors: 
Antecol, Heather
Bedard, Kelly
Year of Publication: 
2001
Series/Report no.: 
Claremont Colleges Working Papers in Economics 2001-35
Abstract: 
Labor market attachment differs significantly across black, Mexican and white men; black and Mexican men are more likely to experience unemployment and out of the labor force spells than are white men. While it has long been agreed that potential experience is a poor proxy of actual experience for women, many view it as an acceptable approximation for men. Using the NLSY, this paper documents the substantial difference between potential and actual experience for both black and Mexican men. We show that the fraction of the black/white and Mexican/white wage gaps that are explained by differences in potential experience are very different than the fraction of the racial wage gaps that are explained by actual (real) experience differences. We further show that the fraction of the racial wage gap explained by education is substantially overstated when potential experience is used instead of actual experience.
Subjects: 
Discrimination
Wages
JEL: 
J1
J3
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
825.76 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.