Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/94575
Authors: 
Antecol, Heather
Cobb-Clark, Deborah A.
Trejo, Stephen J.
Year of Publication: 
2001
Series/Report no.: 
Claremont Colleges Working Papers in Economics 2001-26
Abstract: 
Census data for 1990/91 indicate that Australian and Canadian immigrants have higher levels of English fluency, education, and income (relative to natives) than do U.S. immigrants. This skill deficit for U.S. immigrants arises primarily because the United States receives a much larger share of immigrants from Latin America than do the other two countries. After excluding Latin American immigrants, the observable skills of immigrants are similar in the three countries. These patterns suggest that the comparatively low overall skill level of U.S. immigrants may have more to do with geographic and historical ties to Mexico than with the fact that skill-based admissions are less important in the United States than in Australia and Canada.
JEL: 
J61
J68
J31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
149.27 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.