Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/94213
Authors: 
Beckmann, Michael
Cornelissen, Thomas
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 636
Abstract: 
Based on German individual-level panel data, this paper empirically examines the impact of self-managed working time (SMWT) on employee effort. Theoretically, workers may respond positively or negatively to having control over their own working hours, depending on whether SMWT increases work morale, induces reciprocal work intensification, or encourages employee shirking. We find that SMWT employees exert higher effort levels than employees with fixed working hours, but after accounting for observed and unobserved characteristics and for endogeneity, there remains only a modest positive effect. This effect is mainly driven by employees who have a strong work ethic, suggesting that intrinsic motivation is complementary to SMWT. Moreover, reciprocal work intensification does not seem to be an important channel of providing extra effort. Finally, we find no SMWT effect among women with children in need of parental care indicating that these workers primarily choose SMWT to accommodate family obligations.
Subjects: 
self-managed working time
employee effort
reciprocity
work ethic
intrinsic motivation
family obligations
complementarity
JEL: 
J24
J81
M50
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
458.24 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.