Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/93692
Authors: 
Stroschein, Sherrill
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
WIDER Working Paper 2013/089
Abstract: 
This paper examines Bosnia with some comparative insights from Northern Ireland. Both places were extremely fragile in the immediate aftermath of their brokered peace negotiations and consociational institutions, in Bosnia in 1995 and Northern Ireland in 1998. Bosnia in particular was the recipient of a large amount of international aid. While this aid was crucial to the initial state-building effort, the problems Bosnia now faces are due to its consociational governance structure. Some of the group-based aspects of consociationalism are at odds with individual rights, a problem which cannot be addressed by aid alone.
Subjects: 
Bosnia
Northern Ireland
consociationalism
consociational
Dayton Agreement
international aid
peace agreements
JEL: 
F50
F51
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
253.38 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.