Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/93614
Authors: 
Niepmann, Friederike
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Staff Report, Federal Reserve Bank of New York 576
Abstract: 
This paper develops and tests a theoretical model that allows for the endogenous decision of banks to engage in international and global banking. International banking, where banks raise capital in the home market and lend it abroad, is driven by differences in factor endowments across countries. In contrast, global banking, where banks intermediate capital locally in the foreign market, arises from differences in country-level bank efficiency. Together, these two driving forces determine the foreign assets and liabilities of a banking sector. The model provides a rationale for the observed rise in global banking relative to international banking. Its key predictions regarding the cross-country pattern of foreign bank asset and liability holdings are strongly supported by the data.
Subjects: 
international banking
cross-border lending
capital flows
trade in banking services
JEL: 
F21
F23
F34
G21
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.