Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/93357
Authors: 
Bicakova, Alena
Jurajda, Štepán
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 7965
Abstract: 
It is well known that highly 'female' fields of study in tertiary education are characterized by higher fertility. However, existing work does not disentangle the selection-causality nexus. We use variation in gender composition of fields of study implied by the recent expansion of tertiary education in 19 European countries and a difference-in-differences research design, to show that the share of women on study peer groups affects early fertility levels only little. Early fertility by endogamous couples, i.e., by tertiary graduates from the same field of study, declines for women and increases for men with the share of women in the group, but non-endogamous fertility almost fully compensates for these effects, consistent with higher early fertility in highly 'female' fields of study being driven by selection of family-oriented students into these fields. We also show that the EU-wide level of gender segregation across fields of study has not changed since 2000.
Subjects: 
field-of-study gender segregation
tertiary graduates
fertility
JEL: 
I23
J13
J16
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
324.9 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.