Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/93313
Authors: 
Arbel, Yuval
Bar-El, Ronen
Siniver, Erez
Tobol, Yossi
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 7946
Abstract: 
We examine the effect of adherence to behavioral codes, as measured by the degree of religiosity, on the level of honesty by conducting under-the-cup die experiments. The findings suggest that behavioral codes, which prohibit lying, offset the monetary incentive to lie. The highest level of honesty is found among young religious females while the lowest is found among secular females. Moreover, when the monetary incentive to lie is removed, the tendency of secular subjects to lie disappears. Given the strict separation between the secular and religious education systems the research findings confirm the importance of education in instilling ethical values.
Subjects: 
honesty
religion
behavioral codes
ethical values
JEL: 
C91
D63
Z12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
717.88 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.