Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/93273
Authors: 
Andalón, Mabel
Williams, Jenny
Grossman, Michael
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 7900
Abstract: 
Large differences in fertility between women with high and low levels of education suggest that schooling may have a direct impact on knowledge and use of contraception. We investigate this issue using information on women in Mexico. In order to identify the causal effect of schooling, we exploit temporal and geographic variation in the number of lower secondary schools built following the extension of compulsory education in Mexico from 6th to 9th grade in 1993. We show that raising females' schooling beyond 6th grade increases their knowledge of contraception during their reproductive years and increases their propensity to use contraception at sexual debut. This indicates that the impact of schooling on women's wellbeing extends beyond improved labour market outcomes and includes greater autonomy over their fertility.
Subjects: 
schooling
empowerment
contraception
knowledge
natural experiment
Mexico
JEL: 
I10
I18
I25
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
451.04 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.