Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/93114
Authors: 
Koos, Carlo
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
GIGA Working Papers 244
Abstract: 
Studies have found that politically deprived groups are more likely to rebel. However, does rebellion increase the likelihood of achieving political rights? This article proposes that rebellion helps ethnic groups to overcome deprivation. I illustrate this by using a typical case (the Ijaw's struggle against the Nigerian government) to demonstrate how ethnic rebellion increases the costs for the government to a point where granting political rights becomes preferable to war. Further, I exploit time-series-cross-sectional data on deprived ethnic groups to show that rebellion is significantly associated with overcoming deprivation. The statistical analysis shows that democratic change is an alternative mechanism.
Subjects: 
political deprivation
ethnic conflict
violence
effectiveness
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
737.03 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.