Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/93010
Authors: 
Kunzmann, Ute
Richter, David
Schmukle, Stefan C.
Year of Publication: 
Dec-2013
Citation: 
[Journal:] Emotion [ISSN:] 1528-3542 [Volume:] 13 [Issue:] 6 [Pages:] 1086-1095
Abstract: 
Using cross-sectional and longitudinal data from a national sample spanning the adult life span, age differences in anger and sadness were explored. The cross-sectional and longitudinal findings consistently suggest that the frequency of anger increases during young adulthood, but then shows a steady decrease until old age. By contrast, the frequency of sadness remains stable over most of adulthood and begins to increase in old age. In addition, the effects of age on happiness were investigated; the cross-sectional evidence speaks for a steady decrease in happiness across age groups, but within-person decline in happiness was only evident in old age. Together the findings provide further evidence for multidirectional age differences in affective experience and suggest that the overall quality of affective experience may deteriorate in old age.
Subjects: 
sadness
anger
happiness
aging
effect
emotion
adult life-span
longitudinal change
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Additional Information: 
This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record. The final published version is available at http://psycnet.apa.org/doi/10.1037/a0033572
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.