Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/92766
Authors: 
Kadoya, Yoshihiko
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
ISER Discussion Paper, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University 847
Abstract: 
In order to respond to the social security needs of an increasingly aged population, many governments with limited budgets are required to focus available resources on the direct causes of people's anxieties about aging. This study investigated the causes of people's anxieties about life after the age of 65 using household data from countries with different social contexts: Japan, the United States, and China. This research uncovered three major findings. First, the speed of population aging does not always make people anxious about life at an older age. Second, high financial status effectively lessens people's levels of anxiety about their older years in Japan and the United States. Third, living with a child does not necessarily lessen people's concern about life after 65.
Subjects: 
ageing
social security
future concern
precautionary saving
comparative studies
JEL: 
H53
I38
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
186.18 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.