Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/92365
Authors: 
Babcock, Linda
Congdon, William J.
Katz, Lawrence F.
Mullainathan, Sendhil
Year of Publication: 
2012
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA Journal of Labor Policy [ISSN:] 2193-9004 [Publisher:] Springer [Place:] Heidelberg [Volume:] 1 [Year:] 2012 [Pages:] 1-14
Abstract: 
Labor market policies succeed or fail at least in part depending on how well they reflect or account for behavioral responses. Insights from behavioral economics, which allow for realistic deviations from standard economic assumptions about behavior, have consequences for the design and functioning of labor market policies. We review key implications of behavioral economics related to procrastination, difficulties in dealing with complexity, and potentially biased labor market expectations for the design of selected labor market policies including unemployment compensation, employment services and job search assistance, and job training.
Subjects: 
behavioral economics
unemployment insurance
job training
job search
JEL: 
D03
D04
J08
J24
J64
J65
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
224.37 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.