Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/92240
Authors: 
Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina
Borra, Cristina
Year of Publication: 
2013
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA Journal of Migration [ISSN:] 2193-9039 [Publisher:] Springer [Place:] Heidelberg [Volume:] 2 [Year:] 2013 [Pages:] 1-26
Abstract: 
This paper explores differences in work injury and fatality rates between immigrants and natives and how they may have been impacted by the recent economic downturn. Our focus is on Spain over the 2001-2010 decade -a period of time during which Spain received one of the largest immigrant inflows of any developed economy and subsequently experienced a recession that has raised national unemployment rates above 20 percent. We find that immigrants worked in riskier jobs than natives during this high immigration period. Furthermore, the recession appears to have exclusively reduced job injury rates, but not fatality rates, among the average immigrant -hinting on their misreporting due to fear of dismissal as the primary cause for the observed decline. Overall, the figures are suggestive of work safety inequalities that may be important to address.
Subjects: 
working safety
injuries
fatalities
immigration
great recession
Spain
JEL: 
J61
J81
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
364.74 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.