Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/91768
Authors: 
Lerman, Robert I.
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Policy Paper 61
Abstract: 
Concerns about the polarization of the labor market are widespread. However, countries vary widely in strategies for strengthening jobs at intermediate levels of skill. This paper examines the diversity of approaches to apprenticeship and related training for middle-level occupations. We begin by defining and describing middle-skills occupations, largely in terms of education and experience. The next step is to describe skill requirements and alternative approaches to preparing and upgrading the skills of individuals for these occupations. Programs of academic education and apprenticeship programs emphasizing work-based learning have often competed for the same space but the full picture reveals significant numbers of complementarities. Third, we consider the evidence on the costs and effectiveness of apprenticeship training in several countries. The final section highlights empirical and policy research results concerning the advantages of apprenticeship training for intermediate level skills, jobs, and careers.
Subjects: 
training
apprenticeship
skills
JEL: 
J23
J24
I21
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
284.18 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.