Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/91527
Authors: 
Fitzsimons, Emla
Malde, Bansi
Mesnard, Alice
Vera-Hernandez, Marcos
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IFS Working Papers W14/02
Abstract: 
Incorrect knowledge of the health production function may lead to inefficient household choices, and thereby to the production of suboptimal levels of health. This paper studies the effects of a randomised intervention in rural Malawi which, over a six-month period, provided mothers of young infants with information on child nutrition without supplying any monetary or in-kind resources. A simple model first investigates theoretically how nutrition and other household choices including labour supply may change in response to the improved nutrition knowledge observed in the intervention areas. We then show empirically that, in line with this model, the intervention improved child nutrition, household consumption and consequently health. These increases are funded by an increase in male labor supply. We consider and rule out alternative explanations behind these findings. This paper is the first to establish that non-health choices, particularly parental labor supply, are affected by parents' knowledge of the child health production function.
Subjects: 
Infant Health
Health Information
Labor Supply
Cluster Randomized Control Trial
JEL: 
D10
I15
I18
O12
O15
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.